2021 popular The Autobiography of Malcolm X (As new arrival Told to new arrival Alex Haley) online

2021 popular The Autobiography of Malcolm X (As new arrival Told to new arrival Alex Haley) online

2021 popular The Autobiography of Malcolm X (As new arrival Told to new arrival Alex Haley) online
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ONE OF TIME’S TEN MOST IMPORTANT NONFICTION BOOKS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

In the searing pages of this classic autobiography, originally published in 1964, Malcolm X, the Muslim leader, firebrand, and anti-integrationist, tells the extraordinary story of his life and the growth of the Black Muslim movement. His fascinating perspective on the lies and limitations of the American Dream, and the inherent racism in a society that denies its nonwhite citizens the opportunity to dream, gives extraordinary insight into the most urgent issues of our own time. The Autobiography of Malcolm X stands as the definitive statement of a movement and a man whose work was never completed but whose message is timeless. It is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand America.

Praise for The Autobiography of Malcolm X

“Extraordinary . . . a brilliant, painful, important book.” The New York Times

“This book will have a permanent place in the literature of the Afro-American struggle.” —I. F. Stone

Review

“Malcolm X’s autobiography seemed to offer something different. His repeated acts of self-creation spoke to me; the blunt poetry of his words, his unadorned insistence on respect, promised a new and uncompromising order, martial in its discipline, forged through sheer force of will.” —Barack Obama, Dreams from My Father

“A great book . . . Its dead level honesty, its passion, its exalted purpose, will make it stand as a monument to the most painful truth.” The Nation
 
“The most important book I’ll ever read, it changed the way I thought, it changed the way I acted. It has given me courage I didn’t know I had inside me. I’m one of hundreds of thousands whose lives were changed for the better.” —Spike Lee

From the Publisher

We all know that The Autobiography of Malcolm X is a modern classic. Time Magazine''s recent naming of it as One of the Top Ten Works of Nonfiction for this century, confirms that the book is a must have for every home library.

From the Inside Flap

"Extraordinary. A brilliant, painful, and important book."
THE NEW YORK TIMES
If there was any one man who articulated the anger, the struggle, and the beliefs of African Americans in the 1960s, that man was Malcolm X. His AUTOBIOGRAPHY is the result of a unique collaboration between Alex Haley and Malcolm X, whose voice and philosophy resonate from every page, just as his experience and his intelligence continue to speak to millions.

From the Back Cover

rdinary. A brilliant, painful, and important book."
THE NEW YORK TIMES
If there was any one man who articulated the anger, the struggle, and the beliefs of African Americans in the 1960s, that man was Malcolm X. His AUTOBIOGRAPHY is the result of a unique collaboration between Alex Haley and Malcolm X, whose voice and philosophy resonate from every page, just as his experience and his intelligence continue to speak to millions.

About the Author

Alex Haley is the world-renowned author of Roots, which has sold six million hardcover copies and has been translated into thirty languages. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. Alex Haley died in February 1992.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

CHAPTER 1
 
NIGHTMARE
 
When my mother was pregnant with me, she told me later, a party of hooded Ku Klux Klan riders galloped up to our home in Omaha, Nebraska, one night. Surrounding the house, brandishing their shotguns and rifles, they shouted for my father to come out. My mother went to the front door and opened it. Standing where they could see her pregnant condition, she told them that she was alone with her three small children, and that my father was away, preaching, in Milwaukee. The Klansmen shouted threats and warnings at her that we had better get out of town because “the good Christian white people” were not going to stand for my father’s “spreading trouble” among the “good” Negroes of Omaha with the “back to Africa” preachings of Marcus Garvey.
 
My father, the Reverend Earl Little, was a Baptist minister, a dedicated organizer for Marcus Aurelius Garvey’s U.N.I.A. (Universal Negro Improvement Association). With the help of such disciples as my father, Garvey, from his headquarters in New York City’s Harlem, was raising the banner of black-race purity and exhorting the Negro masses to return to their ancestral African homeland—a cause which had made Garvey the most controversial black man on earth.
Still shouting threats, the Klansmen finally spurred their horses and galloped around the house, shattering every window pane with their gun butts. Then they rode off into the night, their torches flaring, as suddenly as they had come.
 
My father was enraged when he returned. He decided to wait until I was born—which would be soon—and then the family would move. I am not sure why he made this decision, for he was not a frightened Negro, as most then were, and many still are today. My father was a big, six-foot-four, very black man. He had only one eye. How he had lost the other one I have never known. He was from Reynolds, Georgia, where he had left school after the third or maybe fourth grade. He believed, as did Marcus Garvey, that freedom, independence and self-respect could never be achieved by the Negro in America, and that therefore the Negro should leave America to the white man and return to his African land of origin. Among the reasons my father had decided to risk and dedicate his life to help disseminate this philosophy among his people was that he had seen four of his six brothers die by violence, three of them killed by white men, including one by lynching. What my father could not know then was that of the remaining three, including himself, only one, my Uncle Jim, would die in bed, of natural causes. Northern white police were later to shoot my Uncle Oscar. And my father was finally himself to die by the white man’s hands.
 
It has always been my belief that I, too, will die by violence. I have done all that I can to be prepared.
 
I was my father’s seventh child. He had three children by a previous marriage—Ella, Earl, and Mary, who lived in Boston. He had met and married my mother in Philadelphia, where their first child, my oldest full brother, Wilfred, was born. They moved from Philadelphia to Omaha, where Hilda and then Philbert were born.
 
I was next in line. My mother was twenty-eight when I was born on May 19, 1925, in an Omaha hospital. Then we moved to Milwaukee, where Reginald was born. From infancy, he had some kind of hernia condition which was to handicap him physically for the rest of his life.
 
Louise Little, my mother, who was born in Grenada, in the British West Indies, looked like a white woman. Her father was white. She had straight black hair, and her accent did not sound like a Negro’s. Of this white father of hers, I know nothing except her shame about it. I remember hearing her say she was glad that she had never seen him. It was, of course, because of him that I got my reddish-brown “mariny” color of skin, and my hair of the same color. I was the lightest child in our family. (Out in the world later on, in Boston and New York, I was among the millions of Negroes who were insane enough to feel that it was some kind of status symbol to be light-complexioned—that one was actually fortunate to be born thus. But, still later, I learned to hate every drop of that white rapist’s blood that is in me.)
 
Our family stayed only briefly in Milwaukee, for my father wanted to find a place where he could raise our own food and perhaps build a business. The teaching of Marcus Garvey stressed becoming independent of the white man. We went next, for some reason, to Lansing, Michigan. My father bought a house and soon, as had been his pattern, he was doing freelance Christian preaching in local Negro Baptist churches, and during the week he was roaming about spreading word of Marcus Garvey.
 
He had begun to lay away savings for the store he had always wanted to own when, as always, some stupid local Uncle Tom Negroes began to funnel stories about his revolutionary beliefs to the local white people. This time, the get-out-of-town threats came from a local hate society called The Black Legion. They wore black robes instead of white. Soon, nearly everywhere my father went, Black Legionnaires were reviling him as an “uppity nigger” for wanting to own a store, for living outside the Lansing Negro district, for spreading unrest and dissention among “the good niggers.”
 
As in Omaha, my mother was pregnant again, this time with my youngest sister. Shortly after Yvonne was born came the nightmare night in 1929, my earliest vivid memory. I remember being suddenly snatched awake into a frightening confusion of pistol shots and shouting and smoke and flames. My father had shouted and shot at the two white men who had set the fire and were running away. Our home was burning down around us. We were lunging and bumping and tumbling all over each other trying to escape. My mother, with the baby in her arms, just made it into the yard before the house crashed in, showering sparks. I remember we were outside in the night in our underwear, crying and yelling our heads off. The white police and firemen came and stood around watching as the house burned down to the ground.
 
My father prevailed on some friends to clothe and house us temporarily; then he moved us into another house on the outskirts of East Lansing. In those days Negroes weren’t allowed after dark in East Lansing proper. There’s where Michigan State University is located; I related all of this to an audience of students when I spoke there in January, 1963 (and had the first reunion in a long while with my younger brother, Robert, who was there doing postgraduate studies in psychology). I told them how East Lansing harassed us so much that we had to move again, this time two miles out of town, into the country. This was where my father built for us with his own hands a four-room house. This is where I really begin to remember things—this home where I started to grow up.”
 
After the fire, I remember that my father was called in and questioned about a permit for the pistol with which he had shot at the white men who set the fire. I remember that the police were always dropping by our house, shoving things around, “just checking” or “looking for a gun.” The pistol they were looking for—which they never found, and for which they wouldn’t issue a permit—was sewed up inside a pillow. My father’s .22 rifle and his shotgun, though, were right out in the open; everyone had them for hunting birds and rabbits and other game.
 

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4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
13,161 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Ol blue
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Southern white boy''s seal of approval! Again.
Reviewed in the United States on August 13, 2018
Great story, great storyteller! My first reading was back when I was a kid in rural 1968 Georgia. I had heard all about the man from the evening news, other kids parents through their biased know it all young''ens, and of course some of my own opinionated older family... See more
Great story, great storyteller! My first reading was back when I was a kid in rural 1968 Georgia. I had heard all about the man from the evening news, other kids parents through their biased know it all young''ens, and of course some of my own opinionated older family members. Why was everybody so worked up about this guy still, three years after his death?
So I took it upon myself to read his story for myself. His story stuck with me through the years, always one of my favorite reads. I could never convince others to try it, it was then and still is that controversial. Fifty years later...I bought a copy to re-read his story ( with hindsight as judge). I still feel glad that I chose to read this then and again now. This story is still relevent today. I highly recommend that everyone should read this book, at any age!
257 people found this helpful
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Captain Howdy
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
THE EPILOGUE HAS BEEN OMITTED!!!!
Reviewed in the United States on December 12, 2013
Let me be crystal clear and extremely frank in this review. The Autobiography of Malcolm X is my FAVORITE book and, I believe, one of the most important books written in the 20th Century. There have been many printings of this book and they have had slight alterations... See more
Let me be crystal clear and extremely frank in this review. The Autobiography of Malcolm X is my FAVORITE book and, I believe, one of the most important books written in the 20th Century. There have been many printings of this book and they have had slight alterations throughout their publishing. The original 1965 edition came with photos. There have always been three missing chapters that are still held by a private owner. However, Penguin Modern Classics has reprinted this essential piece of literature anew-WITHOUT THE ORIGINAL EPILOGUE or Ossie Davis'' contributions to the work. This means, essentially, THAT THE ASSASSINATION HAS BEEN REMOVED FROM THE BOOK! Reading this version of the book will leave the reader wondering how Malcolm was assassinated, who was responsible and so forth. In addition, the first page of the book is a generalizing synopsis that has the audacity to claim that Malcolm advocated change through the vehicle of violence. Anyone who has read the complete Malcolm X Autobiography in depth knows fully well that this is untrue, an absolute falsity and misrepresentation that can lead to dangerous miscalculations. Omitting the Epilogue, for a topic this serious, is not only censorship, but one must conclude that it was done intentionally. If it was done intentionally, the only real motive could be to mislead a new generation of people trying to learn THE TRUTH about Malcolm. It''s a shame that they won''t be able to find all of it in his own book!
2,385 people found this helpful
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HHernandez
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It was a fascinating and exciting journey reading about the life of the Great Malcolm X
Reviewed in the United States on July 29, 2018
if You would have asked me what I knew about Malcolm X, I would only tell you that he was a civil rights leader. That was before I read this book. In school they never taught us anything about him and BARELY mentioned his name. The more I read this book the harder it became... See more
if You would have asked me what I knew about Malcolm X, I would only tell you that he was a civil rights leader. That was before I read this book. In school they never taught us anything about him and BARELY mentioned his name. The more I read this book the harder it became to put down! It was a fascinating and exciting journey reading about the life of the Great Malcolm X. Worth the read!
88 people found this helpful
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Kindle Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Astounding
Reviewed in the United States on March 6, 2018
After watching the Spike Lee film this book has long been on my reading list. I was a little hesitant because I might be so outside of the experiences of Malcolm X that I might feel disconnected and alienated that it would be a tough read but I couldn''t have been more... See more
After watching the Spike Lee film this book has long been on my reading list. I was a little hesitant because I might be so outside of the experiences of Malcolm X that I might feel disconnected and alienated that it would be a tough read but I couldn''t have been more wrong. I was totally absorbed in this story. The writing makes everything come alive as we share this emotional and spiritual journey. I devoured it in a week''s time. It becomes compulsive after a while. I was mesmerized by the evolution of this man. He was flawed as he himself would remark and still growing. Yet another life silenced by violence. What would he might have continued to do had he lived and joined forces with other black leaders whom he previously had contempt for. We will never know. The story is inspiring and a cold reminder that so little has changed since then. I cannot recommend this book highly enough. My own favourite section is when he is in prison and discovers a passion for books and knowledge. As a lifelong reader the idea of this discovery eternally kindles my own passions. It is a remarkable book. I would easily place it on my list of all-time favourite books.
63 people found this helpful
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Charles
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
5/5
Reviewed in the United States on April 19, 2018
It''s a reason that Malcolm X (El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz) survived his violent past and completely turned his life around. Since his early life, he was able to analyze situations well and influence people before he was even a public speaker. Malcolm X and his... See more
It''s a reason that Malcolm X (El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz) survived his violent past and completely turned his life around. Since his early life, he was able to analyze situations well and influence people before he was even a public speaker.

Malcolm X and his involvement with the Nation of Islam was just a step in his life. He realized the need for a non-religious organization for black people to transcend their current conditions. As for Islam, Malcolm X''s pilgrimage to Mecca and his account has developed, for me, personal interest in the religion of Islam.

It''s unfortunate that Malcolm''s life was taken by ignorance. He was wise and not afraid to admit his faults. He was for the truth no matter what. El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz is currently the only renown person I wish I could accompany.
58 people found this helpful
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Living Vine
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book about an ignorant person
Reviewed in the United States on October 9, 2018
This book is written wonderfully but I feel a need to share what I''ve learned about this contentious figure, Malcolm X. I feel for Malcolm X as his life started our in just about the worst way possible. However, his hurt was never dealt with, resulting in the... See more
This book is written wonderfully but I feel a need to share what I''ve learned about this contentious figure, Malcolm X.

I feel for Malcolm X as his life started our in just about the worst way possible. However, his hurt was never dealt with, resulting in the anger that followed him his entire life.

Here''s a few comments:

1) he was always looking for a scapegoat, always. He rarely owned up to his problems, but blamed them all on the white devil. A shame.

2) his attitude towards women is disgraceful. Can''t believe his daughter gives an introduction into the book that makes you think he''s a saint when he says he''s never bought his own kids a gift because he was too busy. A completely arrogant man towards women.

3) he was totally ignorant of Islam and what life is like in Muslim countries. His Hajj trip was special, but no where near daily life among Muslims. The fact that he so quickly accepted the main if Islam'' message without investigating more shows said that his whole frustration was with whites, but a turning to Islam.

In summary, Malcolm X goes down as a terrible leader because he pushed hate, violence, and a "I give up" message. Thank God MLK was around to drown out X''s voice.
42 people found this helpful
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Rebecca Strange
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Amazing to say the least.
Reviewed in the United States on April 25, 2018
About 20 years ago I watched the movie with Denzel Washington about the life of Malcolm X. At the time I had no idea who he was at all. Now after all these years, I came across this book and knew that I had to get it. I''ve always been a huge fan of biographies and this... See more
About 20 years ago I watched the movie with Denzel Washington about the life of Malcolm X. At the time I had no idea who he was at all. Now after all these years, I came across this book and knew that I had to get it. I''ve always been a huge fan of biographies and this definitely didn''t disappoint!! Without giving anything away, I will just say this... The writing is absolutely fantastic and holds nothing back when it comes to his past and the details of such. It was extremely informative and interesting to read. Anyone who is a history lover, a biography lover or was like me and just wanted to know more about Malcolm X will thoroughly enjoy this. Personally, I think everyone should read this so that they can understand better the man, his views and opinions, the environment at the time and how he came to his opinions and views. It was very easy to read and at times I found it hard to put down!! I highly recommend this book and after the countless biographies I''ve read, I definitely put this on the top as most important to read.
28 people found this helpful
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Donald N. Powell
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Must read, moving, important
Reviewed in the United States on March 11, 2018
A critically important book about American history and anthropology. This young man was an amazing part of our culture. His pointed message, easily misunderstood, was necessary, overdue and painfully true. Everyone should be exposed to this story as it is one under whose... See more
A critically important book about American history and anthropology. This young man was an amazing part of our culture. His pointed message, easily misunderstood, was necessary, overdue and painfully true. Everyone should be exposed to this story as it is one under whose shadow we continue to live, with intermittent steps backward. Malcolm was incredibly intelligent and hard working, even when he was in his dark times. He was learned without formal education. He was eloquent and insightful without formal training, and frankly, without good role modeling. This book moved me on multiple planes.
18 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

simon tuffs
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
you need to get to know what a truly wonderful man malcolm X turned out to be
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 2, 2016
I would say don''t read the introduction first, because the funeral is in it, you need to get to know what a truly wonderful man malcolm X turned out to be, before you read about the funeral, where you will no doubt shed a tear. I am now checking Malcolm on you tube, What a...See more
I would say don''t read the introduction first, because the funeral is in it, you need to get to know what a truly wonderful man malcolm X turned out to be, before you read about the funeral, where you will no doubt shed a tear. I am now checking Malcolm on you tube, What a brilliant and calm man talks nothing but sense. He could have been mayor of New York and President, unfortunately America is so warped and the populace so controlled. I wish he could have left NY and stepped back for a while. They say the truth shall set you free, the truth got Malcolm X free from the hypocrisy of the nation of Islam, SPEAKING that truth is what got him killed. This book is brilliant, a must read.
55 people found this helpful
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Partick Potter
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Must Read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 4, 2016
A fascinating story and a valuable account of an important 20th century figure. It shows us a driven, disturbed, dynamic young man of tremendous intelligence and resilience which left me wondering what might have been if he had not been murdered before he reached the peak...See more
A fascinating story and a valuable account of an important 20th century figure. It shows us a driven, disturbed, dynamic young man of tremendous intelligence and resilience which left me wondering what might have been if he had not been murdered before he reached the peak of his powers. His journey from a (relatively) happy childhood through turbulent adolescence into a man of history is compelling. We learn of the terrible traumas that shaped his life including the break-up of his family following the racist murder of his father and the subsequent (state induced) breakdown of his mother and the belittling career advice he received at school. We follow him through his teen years as a fast living zoot suited novice gangster with his hair suitably “conked” that leads inevitability to jail where he encounters Elijah Muhammad and converts to Islam. His journey in Islam is fascinating; first he is obsessed with Elijah Mohammed’s teachings which he sees as capturing the struggle of the black man in white supremacist 1950s America then, as his relationship with Elijah deteriorates, he has a further development in his thinking while on the Hajj to Mecca where he experiences people sharing a common cause (Islam) regardless of the colour of the skin. It’s a shame the book is not particularly well written. I think Haley let down Malcolm X by not using his skills as an author (evident, of course, in Roots) to provide better focus to what Malcolm X is looking to say. What we get instead, particularly in the polemic sections of the book that dominate the second part of the autobiography, is writing that comes across as streams of consciousness. As such it is, at times, repetitive, lacking in clarity and somewhat stodgy to read. You can imagine Malcolm X, in his interviews with Hayley that form the basis of this book, letting rip. That, of itself, is interesting. But it doesn’t make the best reading! Overall though, I’d put this in the a list of “must read” books for its insight into an important (and fascinating) person at a pivotal time in 20th century American history.
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Francis
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It''s a textbook of "life!” Ask Barack Obama, he has a copy in is library. How do I know this, go read The Audacity of Hope
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 9, 2016
This guy was one of a kind! In my honest opinion, every being who has an African heritage (take note of the use of words, I didn''t say black, because as far as I know, I haven''t seen a black person before neither have I set eyes on any white folk in my entire existence....See more
This guy was one of a kind! In my honest opinion, every being who has an African heritage (take note of the use of words, I didn''t say black, because as far as I know, I haven''t seen a black person before neither have I set eyes on any white folk in my entire existence. According to Majek Fashek, a popular Nigerian reggae musician: ''...only the angels of God are white'') in them should endeavour to read this book. It is as simple as that. I knew little or nothing about this great and exceptional being before I read his autobiography. The little I knew about him was that he was very “controversial”. Then again, an Irish colleague of mine once told me a couple of years ago that I looked like Malcom X in my glasses. In order not to appear naive, I just laughed, and then made it a point of duty to research on the man - Malcom X. I tell you what, I’m glad I did and now know the “TRUTH”. The word “controversial” has always been used to describe individuals who do not conform to certain “standards”. But I always say this, so long what anyone does is within the ambits of the law, who cares? For me he wasn’t controversial, but just honest about his opinion. He voiced out what most people at the time and even now couldn’t and wouldn’t dare to say just to appear as being politically correct. I say this with every sense of responsibility: one of the greatest crime any individual could commit against themselves is self-deceit. As a Christian first and foremost and a practicing Catholic, I kind of slightly differ on one particular issue he harped on in this book, which has to do with Christianity. Then again, you could argue that his views were influenced by the actions and deeds of those who practised the Christian faith. Who knows what this guy could have achieved if only those threatened by his popularity and wisdom didn''t cut short his life? But, I guess even though they get to spend a million years on planet earth, they will never and can never be as great as Malcom X. For you can only kill a person but not the words of his mouth nor his deeds. Which then leads me to ask the pertinent question, why don’t great men last? You talk about the likes of Robert Nesta Marley, Martin Luther King, Fela Anikulapo Kuti, and the list goes on and on. Just like many other great men who did suffer similar fate as him, his deeds, actions and words continue to loom larger and appear more relevant even to this day! He was indeed an embodiment of wisdom, tenacity, determination and conviction! Malcom X has left an indelible mark in the hearts and conscience of so many people – living and dead, his foes and friends, and people of all racial inclinations.
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A true black hero
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 12, 2021
I recently bought a copy of this book for my 19-year-old grandson who has become interested in the BLM movement. I read it at his age 55 years ago and was moved by Malcolm X''s candour, humility and passion to change himself and thus society. I was having a gap year abroad...See more
I recently bought a copy of this book for my 19-year-old grandson who has become interested in the BLM movement. I read it at his age 55 years ago and was moved by Malcolm X''s candour, humility and passion to change himself and thus society. I was having a gap year abroad in Israel when I saw the news of his assassination on the front page of an English-speaking newspaper in Tel Aviv. I felt instantly stricken by a sadness I could not have anticipated; it was as if I had lost a personal friend.
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Hibzz
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Terrible print. Go buy in store, great book so far.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 31, 2020
Great book (so far) but terrible print. Had to return the book as was literally painful to read. Would give 1 star but didn''t want it to impact the book rating as my issue is with the print quality. Will be going to buy in store. Print is small, faded and blurry. Tried to...See more
Great book (so far) but terrible print. Had to return the book as was literally painful to read. Would give 1 star but didn''t want it to impact the book rating as my issue is with the print quality. Will be going to buy in store. Print is small, faded and blurry. Tried to ignore this but after 30 pages in I found myself torn between wanting to read more and dreading squinting at the book. Can''t believe print this quality is being sold in this day and age.
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