discount Weather: sale A online novel sale

discount Weather: sale A online novel sale

discount Weather: sale A online novel sale

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Product Description

INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BEST SELLER 

From the beloved author of the nationwide best seller Dept. of Speculationone of the New York Times Book Review''s Ten Best Books of the Yeara “darkly funny and urgent” (NPR) tour de force about a family, and a nation, in crisis


Lizzie Benson slid into her job as a librarian without a traditional degree. But this gives her a vantage point from which to practice her other calling: she is a fake shrink. For years she has tended to her God-haunted mother and her recovering addict brother. They have both stabilized for the moment, but Lizzie has little chance to spend her new free time with husband and son before her old mentor, Sylvia Liller, makes a proposal. Sylvia has become famous for her prescient podcast,  Hell and High Water, and wants to hire Lizzie to answer the mail she receives: from left-wingers worried about climate change and right-wingers worried about the decline of western civilization.

As Lizzie dives into this polarized world, she begins to wonder what it means to keep tending your own garden once you''ve seen the flames beyond its walls. When her brother becomes a father and Sylvia a recluse, Lizzie is forced to address the limits of her own experience—but still she tries to save everyone, using everything she''s learned about empathy and despair, conscience and collusion, from her years of wandering the library stacks . . . And all the while the voices of the city keep floating in—funny, disturbing, and increasingly mad.

“Offill’s fragmentary structure evokes an unbearable emotional intensity: something at the core of the story that cannot be narrated directly, by straight chronology, because to do so would be like looking at the sun…” —The New York Times

Review

One of the Wall Street Journal Magazine’s 10 must-read books this winter
Lit Hub’s “14 Books You Should Read in February”
Esquire.com''s “Best Books of 2020”
AV Club''s “5 New Books to Read in February,”
New York Times'' “14 New Books to Watch in February,”
Thrillist''s “21 Books We Can’t wait to Read in 2020,”
Good Housekeeping''s “20 Best Books of 2020,”
PureWow''s “13 Books We Can’t Wait to Read in February.”
Lit Hub – “14 Book You Should Read in February”
Vulture – “11 Notable New Releases”
Entertainment Weekly – “20 New Books to Read in February”
Hello Giggles – “11 Best New Books to Read in February”
Bustle – “22 Most Anticipated Books of February”

 
“Brilliant… Offill’s writing is brisk and comic, and her book’s format underlines her gifts. “Weather” is her most soulful book…  [Her] humor is saving humor; it’s as if she’s splashing vinegar to deglaze a pan.”
—The New York Times

"Jenny Offill is the master of novels told in sly, burnished fragments... In Offill’s hands, the form becomes something new, a method of distilling experience into its brightest, most blazing forms — atoms of intense feeling... these fragments feel like: teeming worlds suspended in white space, entire novels condensed into paragraphs... What she is doing is coming as close as anyone ever has to writing the very nature of being itself... “Weather” transforms the novel of consciousness into a record of climate grief."
--Parul Sehgal, The New York Times profile

“Time flies by in this wry story of a family—librarian Lizzie, her classics buff husband, their son, and her brother, a recovering addict. Apocalypse (climate and otherwise) looms over the narrative, and yet it is funny and hopeful too.”
--Vanity Fair

“We named Offill''s previous novel, the shrewd and genre-destroying  Dept. of Speculation, as a book every woman should read; this follow-up, a sort of spiritual sequel, solidifies the author''s place among the vanguard of writers who are reinvigorating literature.”
--O The Oprah Magazine

“Compact and wholly contemporary, Jenny Offill’s third novel sees a librarian find deep meaning and deep despair in her side gig as an armchair therapist for those in existential crisis, including liberals fearing climate apocalypse and conservatives fearing the demise of ‘American values.’ As she attempts to save everyone, our protagonist is driven to her limits, making for a canny, comic story about the power of human need.”
--Esquire

“Tiny in size but immense in scope, radically disorienting yet reassuringly humane, strikingly eccentric and completely irresistible…utterly exhilarating in its wit and intelligence…luminous.” 
--The Boston Globe

"Genius... [A] lapidary masterwork... Remarkable and resonant... The right novel for the end of the world."
--The LA Times

"Another perfectly wonderful trip inside the mind of Jenny Offill... [Her] fiction is such a pleasure to read... the funniness of many of her sentences indicates how precisely she calibrates them."
--Slate

“Ptent... Offill is a master of the glancing blow."
--NPR.org

“Glorious, dizzying, disconcerting and often laugh-out-loud hysterical”
--USA Today

"Always wry and wise. Offill offers an acerbic observer with a wide-ranging mind in this marvelous novel. "
--Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"Clever and seductive . . . the "weather" of our days both real and metaphorical, is perfectly captured in Offill''s brief, elegant paragraphs, filled with insight and humor. Offill is good company for the end of the world."
--Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

"Revelatory . . . Offill, who will delight fans of Lydia Davis and Joy Williams, performs breathtaking emotional and social distillation in this pithy and stealthily resonant tale of a woman trying to keep others, and herself, from "tipping into the abyss."
--Booklist (starred review)

“This is so good. We are not ready nor worthy.”
--Ocean Vuong

"Jenny Offill writes beautiful sentences; she is also a deft curator of silences. It’s this counterpoint of eloquence and felt absence that enables her to register the emotional and political weather of our present."
--Ben Lerner

"No one writes about the intersection of love and existential despair like Jenny Offill." 
--Jia Tolentino

"Jenny Offill conjures entire worlds with her steady, near-pointillist technique. One feels a whole heaving, breathing universe behind her every line. Dread, the sensation of sinking, lostness, and being cast away from any sense of safety infiltrates every interaction and private moment in this book, like ashes from the burning world she describes."
--Sheila Heti

“Novelists don’t need to dream the end of the world anymore—they need to wake up to it. Jenny Offill is one of today’s few essential voices, because she writes about essential things, in sentences so clipped and glittering it’s as if they are all cut from one diamond.”
--Jonathan Dee

" Weather is a beautiful book, both subtle and powerful. In writing, that’s a superhuman feat. And now is exactly when we need the superhumans. Make haste. Read it."
--Lydia Millet


"There is no doubt that Jenny Offill is the writer for this particular historical moment. Weather is a tour de force of her considerable and startling gifts: the compressed and gorgeous sentences, the astounding comic timing, the profound and wise surprises. The miracle of this novel is how it looks at our contradictions and conditions with such bracing honesty and yet gives us a tender hopefulness toward these fraught humans. Offill makes us feel implicated but also loved."
--Dana Spiotta

About the Author

JENNY OFFILL is the author of the novels Last Things (a New York Times Notable Book of the Year and a finalist for the Los Angeles Times First Fiction Award) and Dept. of Speculation, which was shortlisted for the Folio Prize, the Pen-Faulkner Award, and the International Dublin Literary Award. She lives in upstate New York and teaches at Syracuse University and in the low-residency program at Queens University.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

One

In the morning, the one who is mostly enlightened comes in. There are stages and she is in the second to last, she thinks. This stage can be described only by a Japanese word. “Bucket of black paint,” it means.

I spend some time pulling books for the doomed adjunct. He has been working on his dissertation for eleven years. I give him reams of copy paper. Binder clips and pens. He is writing about a phi­losopher I have never heard of. He is minor, but instrumental, he told me. Minor but instrumental!

But last night, his wife put a piece of paper on the fridge. Is what you’re doing right now making money? it said.
 
The man in the shabby suit does not want his fines lowered. He is pleased to contribute to our institu­tion. The blond girl whose nails are bitten to the quick stops by after lunch and leaves with a purse full of toilet paper.

I brave a theory about vaccinations and another about late capitalism. “Do you ever wish you were thirty again?” asks the lonely heart engineer. “No, never,” I say. I tell him that old joke about going backward.

We don’t serve time travelers here.
A time traveler walks into the bar.

On the way home, I pass the lady who sells whirl­ing things. Sometimes when the students are really stoned, they’ll buy them. “No takers today,” she says. I pick out one for Eli. It’s blue and white, but blurs to blue in the wind. Don’t forget quarters, I remember.

At the bodega, Mohan gives me a roll of them. I admire his new cat, but he tells me it just wan­dered in. He will keep it though because his wife no longer loves him.

“I wish you were a real shrink,” my husband says.
“Then we’d be rich.”
 

 
Henry’s late. And this after I took a car service so I wouldn’t be. When I finally spot him, he’s drenched. No coat, no umbrella. He stops at the corner, gives change to the woman in the trash- bag poncho.

My brother told me once that he missed drugs because they made the world stop calling to him. Fair enough, I said. We were at the supermarket. All around us things tried to announce their true nature. But their radiance was faint and fainter still beneath the terrible music.

I try to get him warmed up quickly: soup, coffee. He looks good, I think. Clear- eyed. The waitress makes a new pot, flirts with him. People used to stop my mother on the street. What a waste, they’d say. Eyelashes like that on a boy!

So now we have extra bread. I eat three pieces while my brother tells me a story about his NA meeting. A woman stood up and started ranting about antidepressants. What upset her most was that people were not disposing of them properly. They tested worms in the city sewers and found they contained high concentrations of Paxil and Prozac.

When birds ate these worms, they stayed closer to home, made more elaborate nests, but appeared unmotivated to mate. “But were they happier?” I ask him. “Did they get more done in a given day?”
 

 
The window in our bedroom is open. You can see the moon if you lean out and crane your neck. The Greeks thought it was the only heavenly object similar to Earth. Plants and animals fifteen times stronger than our own inhabited it.

My son comes in to show me something. It looks like a pack of gum, but it’s really a trick. When you try to take a piece, a metal spring snaps down on your finger. “It hurts more than you think,” he warns me.

Ow.

I tell him to look out the window. “That’s a wax-ing crescent,” Eli says. He knows as much now about the moon as he ever will, I suspect. At his old school, they taught him a song to remember all its phases. Sometimes he’ll sing it for us at din-ner, but only if we do not request it.

The moon will be fine, I think. No one’s worrying about the moon.


 
The woman with the bullhorn is at the school door this morning. She’s warning the parents not to go in, to leave the children there behind the red line. “Safety first!” she yells. “Safety first!”

But sometimes Eli cries if he’s left in that loud scrum of people. He doesn’t like having to walk alone from one side of that huge cafeteria to the other. Once he froze in the middle until some aide grabbed him by the elbow and pushed him toward his corner.

So today we make a run for it and dart past her to his assigned assembly point. His friend is at the table and has animal crackers, so I make it out of there without tears, but not before the bullhorn woman screams at me. “No parents! No parents may accompany their children!”

God, she loves that bullhorn. Something shoots through my body at the sound of her voice, then I’m out on the street again, telling myself not to think.
 
I’m not allowed to think about how big this school is or how small he is. I’ve made that mistake after other drop-offs. I should be used to it by now, but sometimes I get spooked all over again.
 

 
 
All day long cranky professors. I swear the ones with tenure are the crankiest. They will cut past other people in line to check out a book or set up their hold list. Studies have shown that 94% of college professors think that they do above average work.
 
They gave us a guide the other day. Tips for Dealing with Problem Patrons. The professors weren’t mentioned. There were the following categories.

Malodorous
Humming
Laughing
Defacing
Laundering
Combative
Chattering
Lonely
Coughing

But how to categorize this elderly gentleman who keeps asking me to give him the password for his own email? I try to explain that it is not possible for me to know this, that only he knows this, but he just shakes his head in that indignant way that means, What kind of help desk is this?
 


There’s a poster of Sylvia at the bus stop. It says she’s coming to give a talk on campus. Years ago, I was her grad student, but then I gave up on it. She used to check in on me sometimes to see if I was still squandering my promise. The answer was always yes. Finally, she pulled some strings to
get me this job even though I don’t have a proper degree for it.
 
On the way home, I listen to her new podcast . This episode is called “The Center Cannot Hold.” They could all be called that. But Sylvia’s voice is almost worth the uptick in dread. It’s soothing to me even though she talks only of the invisible horsemen galloping toward us.

There are recognizable patterns of ascent and decline. But our industrial civilization is so vast, it has such reach . . .
 
I look out the window. Something in the distance, limping toward the trees.
 

 
The door opens and Eli hurls himself at me. I help him peel some rubber cement off his hands, then he goes back to his game. This is the one that everyone likes. It is a 3-D procedurally generated world, according to my husband. Educational.
 
It’s fun to watch them play. They put together buildings block by block, then fill the rooms with minerals that they have mined with pickaxes they have made. They assemble green fields and raise chickens to eat. “I killed one!” Eli yells. “It’s almost night,” Ben tells him.

There are bills and supermarket flyers. Also a magazine addressed to a former tenant. The cover promises tips for helping depressive people.

What to say:

I’m sorry that you’re in so much pain. I am not going to leave you. I am going to take care of myself, so you don’t need to worry that your pain might hurt me.

What not to say:

Have you tried chamomile tea?

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3.8 out of 53.8 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

oldschool
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Weather: NOT a novel
Reviewed in the United States on February 14, 2020
"Weather " is yet another fragmented, MFA-chic, tedious narration of boring events in the life of a contemporary jaded writer. From "Orange, Fame, Citrus" to now, I suspect we are being served up the barely edited journal entries of frantic careerists forced to meet... See more
"Weather " is yet another fragmented, MFA-chic, tedious narration of boring events in the life of a contemporary jaded writer. From "Orange, Fame, Citrus" to now, I suspect we are being served up the barely edited journal entries of frantic careerists forced to meet deadlines. To add insult to shoddiness, the book is both tiny - 205 pages including acknowledgments, 5"X7.5" for $23.95. You have been warned. If you want to read real fiction, read Colm Toibin or Lee Barnes or Tana French.
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Ernie Yanarella
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Thin Fictional Gruel at Best!
Reviewed in the United States on February 16, 2020
Oh Higher Power! Please save us from tripe like this "novel"! I was sucked in to buying it on the basis of false advertising reviews featured before its publication suggesting that it wrestled with the perplexities of all of us trying to come to grips with the worst fears... See more
Oh Higher Power! Please save us from tripe like this "novel"! I was sucked in to buying it on the basis of false advertising reviews featured before its publication suggesting that it wrestled with the perplexities of all of us trying to come to grips with the worst fears and risks as we strive to contextualize something so stark and unfathomable as global warming into the routines of our everyday lives. Instead, the most sustained theme in the story is Lizzie the protagonist''s engulfing crisis that involves her effort to assist her brother Henry to get drug and mental therapy and quell his thoughts of killing her newly born daughter Iris after the failure of his short-lived marriage to Catherine. Climate change drifts in and out of focus in the novel''s fragmented plot as an omnipresent, but muted, subtheme at best. The conundrums of weaving so horrific a threat in a manner that acknowledges its interperspnal import and demands collective response deserve much more formidable writing prowess than deployed in what passes for a new and rising subgenre within literary fiction these days. I feel cheated and conned both by its republication marketing and release!
68 people found this helpful
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Virginia Snyder
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Noun verb noun. No plot after 25%.
Reviewed in the United States on February 13, 2020
Maybe there''ll be a point later, but I don''t feel much need to slog through poorly crafted prose, with no plot, a boring heroine, no deep understanding of human nature. Of course I haven''t finished it and I probably won''t. This may appeal to some, but it seems to... See more
Maybe there''ll be a point later, but I don''t feel much need to slog through poorly crafted prose, with no plot, a boring heroine, no deep understanding of human nature. Of course I haven''t finished it and I probably won''t.

This may appeal to some, but it seems to be the worst thing I''ve read in a decade.
53 people found this helpful
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JoAnne Goldberg
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
And still more speculation
Reviewed in the United States on February 11, 2020
Lizzie is a university librarian, married with a young son and a depressed brother. Weather unfolds over a period of a few years, and though it''s a quick read, it''s full of pithy and poignant observations as Lizzie contemplates topical traumas and philosophizes on aging,... See more
Lizzie is a university librarian, married with a young son and a depressed brother. Weather unfolds over a period of a few years, and though it''s a quick read, it''s full of pithy and poignant observations as Lizzie contemplates topical traumas and philosophizes on aging, climate change, false optimism, and, of course, marriage.

Nothing extraordinary happens in Weather. Even Dept of Speculation had more of a plot. It''s the literary equivalent of a painting in a modern art gallery, the one with a plain canvas and a two brushstrokes that sold for $1 million. Simple and understated, yet somehow perfect. Lizzie jumps from topic to topic, and in so doing, elevates the mundane to the memorable, the pedestrian to gut-wrenching. "Are you sure you''re my mother?" asks her son early on. "Sometimes you don''t seem like a good enough person."

Everyone in Weather is trying to cling to life and a semblance of normality, even more so after the 2016 elections that occur midway during the book. "Should we get a gun?" Lizzie''s husband asks. "But it''s America. You don''t even get on the news if you shoot less than three people." Thinks Lizzie, in response: "His grandfather''s name was twice as long as his. They shortened it at Ellis Island." (If that seems like a non sequitur, you may not enjoy Weather.) At another juncture, Lizzie''s brother confronts an automobile driver who almost hit them as they walked. "She won''t look at him. ''You and your precious lives,'' she says."

Whiffs of impending peril permeate Weather. In times of disaster, Lizzie reminds us a few times, the brain freezes. Everyone needs a plan of escape, whether a doomstead in New Zealand or a house high on a hill or a motivating mantra. Those who ignore the signs will not survive. It''s not exactly uplifting, which is probably why the last page includes a link to a what-can-we-do-about-all-this? site called Obligatory Note of Hope.

Short but potent. I''ll read it again, maybe tomorrow.
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Jeff LeVine
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Too vague and soft to capture my interest. A novel that''s barely there.
Reviewed in the United States on February 16, 2020
I loved Offill’s previous novel, Dept. of Speculation, and while this one is written in a very similar fashion (tiny fragments of observation), I found it much less engaging. This one has much less plot (I would say it doesn’t even have a plot), and more importantly, much... See more
I loved Offill’s previous novel, Dept. of Speculation, and while this one is written in a very similar fashion (tiny fragments of observation), I found it much less engaging. This one has much less plot (I would say it doesn’t even have a plot), and more importantly, much less humor (though there are still some funny bits, there are also about ten straight up jokes, like out of a cheap joke book jokes scattered about, which just felt weird). With less story to carry the book forward (there’s just the relationships between the barely rendered characters), the observations have to carry a lot of weight, but for me, they most often felt shallow and uninteresting. Maybe that was the point, but banal doesn’t really hold one’s interest. A vague fear of climate change and of Trump haunts the book, a certain collapsology taking over the main characters thoughts, even as she continues to live what seems like a pretty comfortable life in New York, working in a library, married, raising a son, going to therapy with her brother, practicing meditation, going to the dentist. There’s a certain softness to the book, that as I think about it, seems really disappointing. Overall, pretty forgettable.
28 people found this helpful
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RobynJC
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If you want to read about existential dread and hopelessness, have I got a book for you...
Reviewed in the United States on February 18, 2020
I have mixed feelings about this book. No doubt it is beautifully written, almost like a prose poem, written in short bursts of streamlined thought. There is minimal plot: a librarian living in this time of acute climate uncertainty, whose existential dread unravels her and... See more
I have mixed feelings about this book. No doubt it is beautifully written, almost like a prose poem, written in short bursts of streamlined thought. There is minimal plot: a librarian living in this time of acute climate uncertainty, whose existential dread unravels her and the people around her.

I have always believed that the purpose of a story is to illuminate transformation. The only transformation is this novel is a woman who goes from anxiety about potential doom to acceptance of inevitable doom. And to provide a detailed listing of all the ways in which urban elites are planning to survive the earth''s destruction. (Getting three passports for their children, so they can quickly move and work to any country that might be stable; learning survival skills; booking space travel.)

Dear God though. It is so depressing. Perhaps because it feels so real, this sense of inevitable doom. It reads like a book intended to be put in a time capsule, so the aliens who find this dessicated planet centuries from now will be able to understand what life was like for urban elites living near the end of time.

But for those of us who are living right now, at least for this person, I have a hard time co-signing on such despair. I just can’t do it Perhaps our life on earth is temporary. Wait, strike that: for CERTAIN, our life on earth is temporary. It always has been and always will be. So why spend it in such a state of despair?
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chica
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Boring and pointless
Reviewed in the United States on May 26, 2020
So I decided to treat myself during the pandemic and buy 2 ebooks. I am very sad that I spent $12 on this book. I''m actually more angry than sad, because I can''t believe this is a published book. And yes, I finished it because I paid $12 for it, and because I must be... See more
So I decided to treat myself during the pandemic and buy 2 ebooks. I am very sad that I spent $12 on this book. I''m actually more angry than sad, because I can''t believe this is a published book. And yes, I finished it because I paid $12 for it, and because I must be wrong, because of all the great reviews the book has gotten.

Weather is basically a stream of consciousness from the author. Sometimes it is punctuated with jokes. Very little happens, and I guess that''s true of life, but no one reads or experiences my life, or pays for it. It is "about" Lizzie, a librarian, her addicted/mentally ill brother, her husband and son, and a few other people. Anything that resembles a plot could be written in 10 pages- good marriage, normal child, sick brother. Lizzie is obsessed with a catastrophe happening, and begins thinking like a prepper, but takes no steps, just thinks.

I enjoyed the jokes, but I didn''t find the rest of the writing particularly interesting or good. Lots of modern day clichés- women are invisible after 50, white people have privilege, people are uncaring. It was a bad, boring book, I am very sorry I spent my money on it.
7 people found this helpful
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Fledge
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Funny and Tragic in Equal Measures
Reviewed in the United States on February 15, 2020
This is a gem of a book! Superbly well written, insightful and, at times, very funny this is a novel that addresses many of the anxieties of our present time. The fragmented structure of the writing will be off-putting to many readers. If you''re someone who doesn''t like... See more
This is a gem of a book! Superbly well written, insightful and, at times, very funny this is a novel that addresses many of the anxieties of our present time. The fragmented structure of the writing will be off-putting to many readers. If you''re someone who doesn''t like anything but straight prose, then you''ll probably want to pass on this book. It''s almost a written version of a well-crafted stand-up comedy routine. Each passage has a finely honed edge and gets a emotional response from you. Sometimes you share in the protagonist Lizzie''s sense of frustration and dread and then your smiling at her plucky sense of humor in the very next paragraph.

We are so many different things to so many different people in our lives. With so many obligations and expectations asked of us on a daily basis it''s easy to lose ones own identity. Lizzie struggles to maintain the balance of her immediate family ( husband and son) with her extended family (a brother who is a recovering drug addict and father to a infant daughter). Not to mention trying to balance her job with (a librarian) with trying to assist a former mentor with getting out the important and critical message about climate change. Her mentor''s podcast is called ''The Center Cannot Hold'' which is a fine nod to Yeats, an apt warning of the consequences of our current treatment of Planet Earth and, your fear, a somber prediction for the future Lizzie''s personal life.

But then again, it''s not as dire as all that. Lizzie continues being Lizzie and getting through life the best that she can. Most importantly she maintains her sense of humor. As a coping device she researches about how to become a ''prepper'' with a whole slew of trivia tidbits dredged up on Google; create a 2 hour candle from a can of tuna - oil packed, not water packed, create fire from a foil chewing gum wrapper and a nine volt battery, catch fish with a wad a chewed gum and a paperclip hook, etc... No factoid is too esoteric or random for her not to squirrel away for later use. Then reality sets in:

''... one day I have to run to catch a bus. I am so out of breath when I get there that I know in a flash all my preparations for the apocalypse are doomed. I will die early and ignobly.''

Funny, tragic and relatable. But that''s life, isn''t it? As a famous poet wrote: ''All the world''s a stage, and all the men and women merely players: they have their exits and their entrances; and one (wo)man in his(her) time plays many parts...'' Lizzie is one of us. She keeps plugging away and so must we all. This is a very good book and an easy read. I highly recommend it!
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Top reviews from other countries

Amazon Customer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
a slight, deeply ambivalent work
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 16, 2020
reads like a 101 world politics primer. juxtaposition being all, each snippet vies on the page for equal attention. all I had was a building sense that nothing mattered more or less than anything else. and when, with scarce 30 pages left of the novel to go Lizzie, the...See more
reads like a 101 world politics primer. juxtaposition being all, each snippet vies on the page for equal attention. all I had was a building sense that nothing mattered more or less than anything else. and when, with scarce 30 pages left of the novel to go Lizzie, the protagonist, is asked what she is most scared of, top of her list is dentistry. Her teeth, for goodness'' sake. if this is the dread the novel has been building towards, and for which Ocean Vuong would have us prostrate ourselves to, then, really, the state of the world.
10 people found this helpful
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Booklover
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beautiful, brilliant, unmissable
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 16, 2020
The best book I’ve read this year so far. Offill writes so beautifully, and her acutely perfect observations had me highlighting sentence after sentence. It’s personal and political and poetic and pageturningly good.
9 people found this helpful
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sara perkins
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Unbelievable!!!!!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 8, 2020
I don''t understand how this novel could be put on the same tier and Maggie O''Farrell and Hilary Mantel on the shortlist for the 2020 Women''s Prize for Fiction. It doesn''t even seem like fiction to me as there''s hardly a plot. This slim volume of random paragraphs loosely...See more
I don''t understand how this novel could be put on the same tier and Maggie O''Farrell and Hilary Mantel on the shortlist for the 2020 Women''s Prize for Fiction. It doesn''t even seem like fiction to me as there''s hardly a plot. This slim volume of random paragraphs loosely gathered into an order doesn''t even tell a story. Not recommended
6 people found this helpful
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G M BARNES
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Thanks 5 *****
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 19, 2020
Not my usual genre but really enjoying it, so far. Talented author, good to try different styles and genres!
4 people found this helpful
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Discerning reader.
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Dreadful!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 26, 2020
I bought this book as the reviews of it were good. A review is only one person''s opinion, and sometimes I suspect that the authors family write them! I''m sorry to say that I found this book totally boring and uncohesive. If there was a plot, then I struggled to find it....See more
I bought this book as the reviews of it were good. A review is only one person''s opinion, and sometimes I suspect that the authors family write them! I''m sorry to say that I found this book totally boring and uncohesive. If there was a plot, then I struggled to find it. Shan''t bother with reviews in future, but shall read the relevant synopsis and make up my own mind.
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