popular Genghis: Lords of wholesale the lowest Bow (The Conqueror Series) sale

popular Genghis: Lords of wholesale the lowest Bow (The Conqueror Series) sale

popular Genghis: Lords of wholesale the lowest Bow (The Conqueror Series) sale

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From the author of the bestselling The Dangerous Book for Boys
 
Conn Iggulden’s novels are grand historical tales of conquest and vengeance, cruelty and greatness. Now the acclaimed author of Genghis: Birth of an Empire delivers a masterful new novel of the mighty Mongol conqueror—as Genghis Khan sets out to unify an entire continent under his rule.…

He came from over the horizon, a single Mongol warrior surrounded by his brothers, sons, and fellow tribesmen. With each battle his legend grew and the ranks of his horsemen swelled, as did his ambition. For centuries, primitive tribes had warred with one another. Now, under Genghis Khan, they have united as one nation, setting their sights on a common enemy: the great, slumbering walled empire of the Chin.

A man who lived for battle and blood, Genghis leads his warriors across the Gobi Desert and into a realm his people had never seen before—with gleaming cities, soaring walls, and canals. Laying siege to one fortress after another, Genghis called upon his cunning and imagination to crush each enemy in a different way, to overcome moats, barriers, deceptions, and superior firepower—until his army faced the ultimate test of all.

In the city of Yenking—modern-day Beijing—the Chin will make their final stand, setting a trap for the Mongol raiders, confident behind their towering walls. But Genghis will strike with breathtaking audacity, never ceasing until the Emperor himself is forced to kneel.

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Iggulden, coauthor of the megaseller The Dangerous Book for Boys, continues his masterful series on Genghis Khan (following Genghis: Birth of an Empire) with another vividly imagined chapter. In the debut volume, the Great Khan rises from the barren plains of central Asia to unify the scattered Mongol tribes into a nation. Here, Genghis turns to the conquest of the bloated, wealthy cities of the Chin, or Chinese, Kingdom. Aided by his brothers Kachiun and Khasar, Genghis strikes first against the Xi Xia Kingdom south of the Gobi Desert—a route into China that circumvents the Great Wall. The Mongols'' insatiable quest to conquer drives the narrative, but Iggulden deftly weaves several intriguing character-driven subplots into the saga, including tales of sibling rivalry between Genghis''s two eldest sons and the cupidity of a powerful and enigmatic shaman. Borrowing from history and legend, Iggulden reimagines the iconic conqueror on a more human scale—larger-than-life surely, but accessible and even sympathetic. Iggulden''s Genghis series is shaping up as a triumph of historical fiction. (Apr.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From School Library Journal

Adult/High School—This novel begins where Genghis: Birth of an Empire (Delacorte, 2007) leaves off. After defeating the last of the Mongol tribes, Genghis, with his formidable army, sets his sights toward the Chin, whom he has long vowed to conquer. He has become a fearsome force who, with his ruthlessness and cunning need to vanquish, will lead his army to unfathomable victories. Along the way, readers are introduced to the devious shaman Kokchu and witness the troubled relationship between Genghis and his first born, the dynamics between Genghis and his brothers, and Genghis''s complicated romantic interests. Treachery, intrigue, and rivalry carry the powerful story to its satisfying conclusion, though with the understanding that there will be a third novel that will likely continue with the next generation. Iggulden is a master storyteller who keeps readers hooked with the unexpected twists and turns of an intriguing plot along with insightful character development. A real page-turner.— Jane Ritter, Mill Valley School District, CA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“A triumph of historical fiction.”
Publishers Weekly (starred review)
 
“Iggulden is in a class of his own when it comes to epic, historical fiction.”
Daily Mirror (UK)

“Readers who enjoy well-researched tales of historical adventure with an emphasis on political intrigue, exotic settings, and military conflict will enjoy the ride.”
Library Journal



From the Trade Paperback edition.

About the Author

Conn Iggulden is the author of Genghis: Birth of an Empire , the first novel in the series, as well as the Emperor novels, which chronicle the life of Julius Caesar: Emperor: The Gates of Rome, Emperor: The Death of Kings, Emperor: The Field of Swords, and Emperor: The Gods of War , all of which are available in paperback from Dell. He is also the co-author of the bestselling nonfiction work The Dangerous Book for Boys. He lives with his wife and three children in Hertfordshire, England.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter One


In the summer dusk, the encampment of the Mongols stretched for miles in every direction, the great gathering still dwarfed by the plain in the shadow of the black mountain. Ger tents speckled the landscape as far as the eye could see, and around them thousands of cooking fires lit the ground. Beyond those, herds of ponies, goats, sheep, and yaks stripped the ground of grass in their constant hunger. Each dawn saw them driven away to the river and good grazing before returning to the gers. Though Genghis guaranteed the peace, tension and suspicion grew each day. None there had seen such a host before, and it was easy to feel hemmed in by the numbers. Insults imaginary and real were exchanged as all felt the pressure of living too close to warriors they did not know. In the evenings, there were many fights between the young men, despite the prohibition. Each dawn found one or two bodies of those who had tried to settle an old score or grudge. The tribes muttered among themselves while they waited to hear why they had been brought so far from their own lands.

In the center of the army of tents and carts stood the ger of Genghis himself, unlike anything seen before on the plains. Half as high again as the others, it was twice the width and built of stronger materials than the wicker lattice of the gers around it. The construction had proved too heavy to dismantle easily and was mounted on a wheeled cart drawn by eight oxen. As the night came, many hundreds of warriors directed their feet toward it, just to confirm what they had heard and marvel.

Inside, the great ger was lit with mutton-oil lamps, casting a warm light over the inhabitants and making the air thick. The walls were hung with silk war banners, but Genghis disdained any show of wealth and sat on a rough wooden bench. His brothers lay sprawled on piled horse blankets and saddles, drinking and chatting idly.

Before Genghis sat a nervous young warrior, still sweating from the long ride that had brought him amongst such a host. The men around the khan did not seem to be paying attention, but the messenger was aware that their hands were never far from their weapons. They did not seem tense or worried at his presence, and he considered that their hands might always be near a blade. His people had made their decision and he hoped the elder khans knew what they were doing.

"If you have finished your tea, I will hear the message," Genghis said.

The messenger nodded, placing the shallow cup back on the floor at his feet. He swallowed his last gulp as he closed his eyes and recited, "These are the words of Barchuk, who is khan to the Uighurs."

The conversations and laughter around him died away as he spoke, and he knew they were all listening. His nervousness grew.

" ''It is with joy that I learned of your glory, my lord Genghis Khan. We had grown weary waiting for our people to know one another and rise. The sun has risen. The river is freed of ice. You are the gurkhan, the one who will lead us all. I will dedicate my strength and knowledge to you.'' "

The messenger stopped and wiped sweat from his brow. When he opened his eyes, he saw that Genghis was looking at him quizzically and his stomach tightened in fear.

"The words are very fine," Genghis said, "but where are the Uighurs? They have had a year to reach this place. If I have to fetch them . . ." He left the threat dangling.

The messenger spoke quickly. "My lord, it took months just to build the carts to travel. We have not moved from our lands in many generations. Five great temples had to be taken apart, stone by stone, each one numbered so that it could be built again. Our store of scrolls took a dozen carts by itself and cannot move quickly."

"You have writing?" Genghis asked, sitting forward with interest.

The messenger nodded without pride. "For many years now, lord. We have collected the writings of nations in the west, whenever they have allowed us to trade for them. Our khan is a man of great learning and has even copied works of the Chin and the Xi Xia."

"So I am to welcome scholars and teachers to this place?" Genghis said. "Will you fight with scrolls?"

The messenger colored as the men in the ger chuckled. "There are four thousand warriors also, my lord. They will follow Barchuk wherever he leads them."

"They will follow me, or they will be left as flesh on the grass," Genghis replied.

For a moment, the messenger could only stare, but then he dropped his eyes to the polished wooden floor and remained silent.

Genghis stifled his irritation. "You have not said when they will come, these Uighur scholars," he said.

"They could be only days behind me, lord. I left three moons ago and they were almost ready to leave. It cannot be long now, if you will have patience."

"For four thousand, I will wait," Genghis said softly, thinking. "You know the Chin writing?"

"I do not have my letters, lord. My khan can read their words."

"Do these scrolls say how to take a city made of stone?"

The messenger hesitated as he felt the sharp interest of the men around him.

"I have not heard of anything like that, lord. The Chin write about philosophy, the words of the Buddha, Confucius, and Lao Tzu. They do not write of war, or if they do, they have not allowed us to see those scrolls."

"Then they are of no use to me," Genghis snapped. "Get yourself a meal and be careful not to start a fight with your boasting. I will judge the Uighurs when they finally arrive."

The messenger bowed low before leaving the ger, taking a relieved breath as soon as he was out of the smoky atmosphere. Once more he wondered if his khan understood what he had promised with his words. The Uighur ruled themselves no longer.

Looking around at the vast encampment, the messenger saw twinkling lights for miles. At a word from the man he had met, they could be sent in any direction. Perhaps the khan of the Uighurs had not had a choice.

Hoelun dipped her cloth into a bucket and laid it on her son''s brow. Temuge had always been weaker than his brothers, and it seemed an added burden that he fell sick more than Khasar or Kachiun, or Temujin himself. She smiled wryly at the thought that she must now call her son "Genghis." It meant the ocean and was a beautiful word twisted beyond its usual meaning by his ambition. He who had never seen the sea in his twenty-six years of life. Not that she had herself, of course.

Temuge stirred in his sleep, wincing as she probed his stomach with her fingers.

"He is quiet now. Perhaps I will leave for a time," Borte said. Hoelun glanced coldly at the woman Temujin had taken as a wife. Borte had given him four perfect sons and for a time Hoelun had thought they would be as sisters, or at least friends. The younger woman had once been full of life and excitement, but events had twisted her somewhere deep, where it could not be seen. Hoelun knew the way Temujin looked at the eldest boy. He did not play with little Jochi and all but ignored him. Borte had fought against the mistrust, but it had grown between them like an iron wedge into strong wood. It did not help that his three other boys had all inherited the yellow eyes of his line. Jochi''s were a dark brown, as black as his hair in dim light. While Temujin doted on the others, it was Jochi who ran to his mother, unable to understand the coldness in his father''s face when he looked at him. Hoelun saw the young woman glance at the door to the ger, no doubt thinking of her sons.

"You have servants to put them to bed," Hoelun chided. "If Temuge wakes, I will need you here."

As she spoke her fingers drifted over a dark knot under the skin of her son''s belly, just a few fingerbreadths above the dark hair of his groin. She had seen such an injury before, when men lifted weights too heavy for them. The pain was crippling, but most of them recovered. Temuge did not have that kind of luck, and never had. He looked less like a warrior than ever as he had grown to manhood. When he slept, he had the face of a poet, and she loved him for that. Perhaps because his father would have rejoiced to see the men the others had become, she had always found a special tenderness for Temuge. He had not grown ruthless, though he had endured as much as they. She sighed to herself and felt Borte''s eyes on her in the gloom.

"Perhaps he will recover," Borte said.

Hoelun winced. Her son blistered under the sun and rarely carried a blade bigger than an eating knife. She had not minded as he began to learn the histories of the tribes, taking them in with such speed that the older men were amazed at his recall. Not everyone could be skilled with weapons and horses, she told herself. She knew he hated the sneers and gibes that followed him in his work, though there were few who dared risk Genghis hearing of them. Temuge refused to mention the insults and that was a form of courage all its own. None of her sons lacked spirit.

Both women looked up as the small door of the ger opened. Hoelun frowned as she saw Kokchu enter and bow his head to them. His fierce eyes darted over the supine figure of her son, and she fought not to show her dislike, not even understanding her own reaction. There was something about the shaman that set her teeth on edge, and she had ignored the messengers he had sent. For a moment, she drew herself up, struggling between indignation and weariness.

"I did not ask for you," she said coldly.

Kokchu seemed oblivious to the tone. "I sent a slave to beg a moment with you, mother to khans. Perhaps he has not yet arrived. The whole camp is talking of your son''s illness."

Hoelun felt the shaman''s gaze fasten on her, waiting to be formally welcomed as she looked at T...

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
943 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

derrick
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What happened? This book is SO much poorer than the first book
Reviewed in the United States on July 21, 2015
The first book in this series is wonderful. But perhaps it raised the bar too high that the author couldn''t match it a second time. This second book in the series is not nearly as good. There is still action, violence, and lots of conquering. This is still Genghis... See more
The first book in this series is wonderful. But perhaps it raised the bar too high that the author couldn''t match it a second time.
This second book in the series is not nearly as good. There is still action, violence, and lots of conquering. This is still Genghis Khan, after all. There are still battles being fought, and they are still described by the author in exciting and gripping prose. We see the Mongols destroying their enemies and then looking at their enemies cities and just being awestruck by it all. It is kind of funny to read of them acquiring so much wealth in their conquests and yet not having the slightest idea of what to do with all that wealth. Despite the fact that they can take down more advanced civilizations, they prefer to live in a less civilized way. Who needs all this gold and all these buildings anyway? I kind of like that. I feel that way myself many times.
But while the action scenes are exciting, there are three things about this book that make it a much less enjoyable read then the previous book in the series. First, there is an overemphasis placed on the sexual drives of many of the male characters in the story. With the exception of Genghis'' youngest brother, it seems that every male character in the story has a goal of sleeping with as many women as possible. Are you going on a long journey? Let''s find some women along the way so we can sleep with them. Found a beautiful woman after the battle was done? Take her to your tent and keep her there for a few days. See a beautiful woman who is already married? Find some way to kill off the husband and take the woman for yourself. Have a big decision you need to make regarding your family''s future or your nation''s future but you''re not quite sure what the best choice would be. Put off the decision until later. Go have sex first. It really got repetitive and disgusting after a while.
Another reason why this book is not as good as the first is that there are major sections of the book that just slowly drag on without anything exciting happening. The first book had constant excitement and suspense. This book has some exciting scenes, but so much of it is slow. So much of it plods along. It is simply not the page-turner that the first book was.
And the third reason that this book is not as good as the first is that in the first book the author took his time to flesh out multiple characters, making them all interesting. They each had significant time in the spotlight. You got to know Genghis'' wife Borte, his ally Aserem, all his brothers, his mother, and his enemy. In this book, the author has dropped that approach. We see a lot of Genghis, his youngest brother, and Genghis'' new shaman. But that is it. All the other interesting characters are virtually silent. They are still there in the narrative. But you don''t learn anything more about them. They don''t do anything. You never really see how they feel. It is quite jarring. You grew to really like these characters in the first book, and now it is like they don''t matter anymore. It was a huge difference in focus, and the main reason why this book as not as good as the first.
I hope the rest of the series returns to the form set by the first book or this will be a major letdown.
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ZS
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not as good as the first one, not even near
Reviewed in the United States on January 15, 2019
I loved the first novel of the series to the point that I rushed to purchase the sequel with high expectations. But I found myself reading this book lazily, only when I had nothing better to do. Which was not the case with the Birth of an Empire. The characters lost their... See more
I loved the first novel of the series to the point that I rushed to purchase the sequel with high expectations. But I found myself reading this book lazily, only when I had nothing better to do. Which was not the case with the Birth of an Empire. The characters lost their vividness and became boring or one-dimensional. It felt as though I was reading a reader-friendly account of Mongols conquering Xia Kingdom and then Yenking and not the action-adventure character-driven historical fiction I enjoyed so much in the first book. Not moved to continue with the series, regretfully so.
3 people found this helpful
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LovetoHike
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Amazing read!
Reviewed in the United States on December 15, 2013
Where to begin? It was such an amazing series! I love historical fictions, they give you a front row seat into how our world was shaped while breathing life into long dead people. This series did that and MORE! I recommend starting at the first book... See more
Where to begin? It was such an amazing series!

I love historical fictions, they give you a front row seat into how our world was shaped while breathing life into long dead people. This series did that and MORE!

I recommend starting at the first book and, if you are half as into these books as I was, you won''t be able to put them down.

Pros:
- Battle scenes, very descriptive and exciting. I would like to congratulate the author on keeping the types of battles written throughout the series fresh and interesting. They fought constantly for generations but always a new location, new odds, new strategy, new obstacles. Very EXCITING!

-Character development. The number of characters is never overwhelming and you become emotionally invested in their lives. They have varying personalities, goals, dreams, while still keeping a bit of humor.

-Extremely well written

-Great mix of historical fact and page turning dramas. I really enjoyed understanding the life of the Mongols. They are strong people. Very impressive.

-Scenery descriptions, I loved the changes in scenery and I have a much deeper understanding of the climate and environment of the Mongol, Asian, and Islamic parts of the world. Plus the struggles that had to over come to survive and conquer.

-Assassins~! Only the Mongols would take on assassin strong holds...

The author truly captures the essence of this book in his final note:

"This story began as a single starving family, hunted and alone on the plains of Mongolia -- and ends with Kublai Khan ruling an empire larger than that of Julius Ceaser or Alexander the Great. Over just three generations, that is simply the greatest rags-to-riches tale in human history" Conn Iggulden

I am now going to read his Ceaser series and any other historical fiction Conn Iggulden writes!!

WONDERFUL!!!!
3 people found this helpful
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delicateflower152
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Khan''s Empire Continues...
Reviewed in the United States on December 13, 2009
"Tell them to live... that they might see where this Genghis takes us all." Thus spoke the khan of the Naimens as he talked with the tribe''s shaman. That statement summarizes Conn Iggulden''s second book in the Genghis Khan series, "Lords of the Bow." Genghis Khan... See more
"Tell them to live... that they might see where this Genghis takes us all." Thus spoke the khan of the Naimens as he talked with the tribe''s shaman. That statement summarizes Conn Iggulden''s second book in the Genghis Khan series, "Lords of the Bow."

Genghis Khan (Temujin) continues his consolidation of the scattered tribes through conquest. His ultimate goals remain uniting the Mongol tribes and ridding them of the Chin dynasty''s control. In contrast to "Birth of an Empire" which focused on the events impacting the mind-set of Temujin and his brothers, as well as the development of their personalities, "Lords of the Bow" is concentrated on the military and strategic actions which ultimately allow Temujin to reach his goal. Strategy sessions and military battles provide the reader with a unique perspective on the mind and heart of this great leader.

"Lords of the Bow" is not just another fictionalized history of military conquests. Genghis Khan continues to grow as a leader, husband, and father; he recognizes that he must give his oldest son, Jochi, a place in his heart even though that son may be the product of Borte''s rape. Through the influence of Chakahai, the Chinese princess who was given to him as part of peace negotiations, Genghis comes to see the value inherent in the Chinese cities and cultures. Kokchu, shaman of the former Naimans, is introduced as a character in the series and provides an element of treachery. He secretly works against Genghis through his influence over the Khan''s brother Temuge. Temuge remains a weak-willed individual, jealous of his brother; only when Genghis looks to and values Temuge''s strengths as an administrator does there seem to be a potential for reconciliation between the two.

If you enjoy gripping, realistic historical novels and prefer detailed historical novels based on fact, you will like Conn Iggulden''s series about Genghis Khan. I found that "Lords of the Bow" added depth and dimension to overall portrait of Genghis Khan and his hordes.
2 people found this helpful
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Jessie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Less mare milk/More Chin blood
Reviewed in the United States on June 1, 2019
At about the halfway point I found myself galloping through the house with an imaginary pillow pony between my legs and my kids nerf bow in my hand, chasing and downing my enemies (my 3 kids) with arrow after arrow! Then commanding the emperor (my wife) to kneel before me... See more
At about the halfway point I found myself galloping through the house with an imaginary pillow pony between my legs and my kids nerf bow in my hand, chasing and downing my enemies (my 3 kids) with arrow after arrow! Then commanding the emperor (my wife) to kneel before me in defeat! The emperor then rolled her eyes at me and told me to grow up.

But the book was good!
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W. B Crews
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Too long by half
Reviewed in the United States on August 11, 2014
I enjoyed the first book of the series, Birth of an Empire, I found this one to be nearly interminable and fluffed up with details that are irrelevant to the narrative. The action was diffuse. There are far too many characters whose point of view we experience. Genghis is... See more
I enjoyed the first book of the series, Birth of an Empire, I found this one to be nearly interminable and fluffed up with details that are irrelevant to the narrative. The action was diffuse. There are far too many characters whose point of view we experience. Genghis is nearly a tangential character in the novel rather than a central figure. The demotion of Borte from central figure in Ghengis''s life to merely another wife was disappointing and not explained. His tumultuous relationship with his eldest son is largely unexplored and contradictory. The evil shaman is more a pathetic grifter than evil and the dichotomy of a people who we are told are addicted to trickery in battle being credulous pawns to the shaman''s tricks is hard to credit. The battle scenes are well crafted, as usual.

I''m probably not going to buy the next one.
3 people found this helpful
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David M. Wilson
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Khan
Reviewed in the United States on May 25, 2016
This is a great start to what I think is going to be a fantastic series of historical novels based on the life of Genghis Khan. If the author continues this series with as much gusto as he did his series on Julius Caesar I know it is going to be fantastic. The author... See more
This is a great start to what I think is going to be a fantastic series of historical novels based on the life of Genghis Khan. If the author continues this series with as much gusto as he did his series on Julius Caesar I know it is going to be fantastic. The author provides plenty of action and political intrigue as Genghis begins uniting the tribes and Klans, simply seeking to survive on the Mongolian plains. Great details and a wonderful story.
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Ronin
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good Read, Weak Historically
Reviewed in the United States on February 22, 2009
There''s too many rave reviews for this series, and new buyers should know what they are getting because "historical fiction" by this author is very misleading. His Genghis series is more enjoyable than his absolute historical garbage "Emperor" series, which drags... See more
There''s too many rave reviews for this series, and new buyers should know what they are getting because "historical fiction" by this author is very misleading.

His Genghis series is more enjoyable than his absolute historical garbage "Emperor" series, which drags you mindlessly through a fantasy Roman world that is utterly pointless. If you are looking for a good airplane read, Genghis LOTB will do so long as you don''t expect to learn anything of historical authenticity or value. Conn is way too liberal in his alteration of people and events, for no apparent or necessary reason. His portrayal of major characters is way off base, and his lack of knowledge of this subject is apparent throughout the book.

I expect historical fiction writers to first do their homework and have a degree of expertise on the subject before they churn something like this out. Conn clearly failed in this department. At the end, the one book recommended by Conn is "The Secret History of the Mongols". Ok, that''s essential reading for sure, but its no easy read and based on some of the 5-star reviews many fans will find themselves challenged. In a few very rare parts of the book Conn obviously used The Secret History, but the vast majority of the content suggests he has no regard for Mongol history. If you want to read an author who followed The Secret History true, check out "The Blue Wolf" by Inoue Yasushi. It puts this amateur book to shame, though it certainly does not read as well and I do give The Conn credit for this.

I would rather see him recommend something good for his readers like "Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern world". I personally would have been impressed if he recommended "Arms and Armour of the Nomads of the Great Steppe in the Times of the Mongol Expansion" by Witold Swietoslawski or "The Travels of an Alchemist -The Journey of the Taoist Ch''ang-Ch''un from China to the Hindukush at the Summons of Chingiz Khan" by Li Chih-Ch''ang. Unfortunately, his representation of this history suggests he doesn''t have a clue.

I give the book 3-stars, because if I suspend all I know about the Mongol rise and conquests, I can enjoy the pace of the story. Its just very disappointing that Conn couldn''t keep the historical base true, and provide a little more detail on Mongol life with greater authenticity.
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Top reviews from other countries

Peter - The Reading Desk
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Conqueror Series: Book 2
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 10, 2018
Genghis Khan continues to sweep all before him showing a vision for an empire that will stand long after he has gone. The strategy of the Mongol army is fascinating when and how to outsmart their enemy is as much the achievement as the battle itself. The discipline of...See more
Genghis Khan continues to sweep all before him showing a vision for an empire that will stand long after he has gone. The strategy of the Mongol army is fascinating when and how to outsmart their enemy is as much the achievement as the battle itself. The discipline of military planning and execution, the weapons and machines for battle, and the network of scouts and the infrastructure around the armies is absolutely amazing for its time. They meet the age-old enemy the Chin and the battles are fierce and bloody and on a knife edge at times. With the victory, everyone starts to realise that to fight Genghis’ armies they will face an intelligent, brutal and merciless foe. Fight and you will be slaughtered, surrender and you will be integrated into the Mongol empire. The choice for many becomes obvious. The pace of the narrative is relentless and breath-taking. It is jaw dropping to appreciate all the elements the Mongol armies brought to bear in conquering cities and regions, that were so much more advanced than anything that came before.
3 people found this helpful
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C. Hart
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Genghis Khan story (Conqueror 1-4)
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 14, 2012
Lords of the Bow is the second book in a set of 4 which traces the life and times of Genghis Khan. History has never been my strong point, but the way that Conn Iggulden has written this series of books has me fascinated. From the conditions under which the Mongols survived...See more
Lords of the Bow is the second book in a set of 4 which traces the life and times of Genghis Khan. History has never been my strong point, but the way that Conn Iggulden has written this series of books has me fascinated. From the conditions under which the Mongols survived to the brilliance of Genghis on the battlefield, Conn has created a spellbinding novel out of history that makes it very difficult for me to put the book down. He freely admits that he has had to use some guesswork and that some events have been used out of order but this does not detract from the story, rather it enhances it. I am currently on Book 3 but will shortly be looking at the Kindle library to see what else Conn can tempt me with. I strngly recommend these books to anyone that likes action mixed with fact mixed with history and detail.
2 people found this helpful
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Mrs. J.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
History at it''s best
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 24, 2013
I picked up the third book in the series while on holiday in South Africa. It was so refreshing to read about history in a book that you can''t put down. It makes you go off and research the topics to verify the facts, and Conn has stuck to most of the facts religeously....See more
I picked up the third book in the series while on holiday in South Africa. It was so refreshing to read about history in a book that you can''t put down. It makes you go off and research the topics to verify the facts, and Conn has stuck to most of the facts religeously. When I found out I had read book 3 first, I was both annoyed and elated at the same time. Annoyed I had read the book out of order, but elated there were more. I then read the first book and am now into the Lords of the Bow and it gets better and better. I cannot recommend these book enough to anyone who likes history, in fact to anyone, because whether you like history or not these are very entertaining books and are only more so for the fact they are based on reality.
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M. Paton
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Legend
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 1, 2014
I''m a convert. My favourite genre is epic fantasy, but after a recommendation from a friend, decided to give this series a try. I''ve become addicted to this series. The narration is flawless, the pace is gripping, and the way Iggulden has given life to a legend is...See more
I''m a convert. My favourite genre is epic fantasy, but after a recommendation from a friend, decided to give this series a try. I''ve become addicted to this series. The narration is flawless, the pace is gripping, and the way Iggulden has given life to a legend is fantastic. The fiction is well interspersed with historical fact. Unlike many historical fiction writers, he doesn''t avoid the filth and fetor of the times. There is no prissying up of basic human functions, and this brings a sense that the story is actually biographical fact, rather than a well padded out basic history.
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Philip of Ilkley
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Really rewarding read!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 17, 2012
Iggulden is superb. He writes about historical characters and combines their tale with as much action and conspiracy as the best of thrillers. Unlike some thrillers that focus on the main character, Iggulden also brings to life the minor, bit players as real, living...See more
Iggulden is superb. He writes about historical characters and combines their tale with as much action and conspiracy as the best of thrillers. Unlike some thrillers that focus on the main character, Iggulden also brings to life the minor, bit players as real, living breathing individuals who are woven seamlessly into the fabric of his sagas. We missed out on one of his books and local shops were unable to obtain I was very pleased to find "Lords of the Bow" on Amazon and very pleased with the booksellers price and service. Iggulden''s stories progress and the characters develop as the plots unfold. I strongly recommend that to get full value, any new reader should start with the first book in each series.
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